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Drone photographers who want the best aerial images without spending hours of time editing them might want to check out AirMagic, a new program from imaging technology company Skylum of Bellevue, Washington.

The software was developed to automatically fix problems unique to aerial photography. AirMagic can process and improve images with little user involvement, relying on algorithms and artificial intelligence to quickly evaluate and modify each photo to look better.

“We see our mission in creating easy-to-use, yet powerful, solutions for those who take photos,” said Alex Tsepko, Skylum CEO. “While drones are used by hobbyist and professional photographers alike, they’re also in growing usage in various fields ranging from safety and real estate to industrial and agricultural.”

AirMagic works by detecting the drone camera used to produce an image, analyzing its lens and color profile. From there, the program makes automatic lens corrections and other camera-specific optimizations. AirMagic uses smart algorithms and artificial intelligence to evaluate each photograph, applying modifications such as color reveal, haze removal, sky enhancement and other adjustments to improve each photo.

AirMagic supports batch processing, enabling photographers to improve multiple photos simultaneously. Depending on the size of photos and computing power, it can process up to 4 GB of photos simultaneously. AirMagic provides photographers with a quick, one-click interface and gives them the ability to put their own spin on images with five different creative styles. The software supports all popular image formats—including RAW files—and can be used as a plugin for both Photoshop and Lightroom.

AirMagic retails for $39. Mixed-computer households can share the same product key for Mac and PC, which can be activated on two devices. The program comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee.

Beitrag im Original auf http://uasmagazine.com/articles/2005/airmagic-software-designed-to-assist-drone-photographers, mit freundlicher Genehmigung von The UAS Magazine automatisch importiert. Original in englischer Sprache. Der Beitrag gibt nicht unbedingt die Meinung von UAV DACH e.V. wieder.